EXPLORING THE NATIVE AMERICAN UFO—STAR PEOPLE CONNECTION

With A Bit Of Ritualistic Indian Magic Revealed!

By Sean Casteel

*** Read about some of the fascinating petroglyphs and pictographs of the earliest Native Americans, who responded in reverence and awe to the alien presence that created them. The testimony of Native Americans of our own time is equally dramatic and grounded in mysteries still unsolved.

*** There are many divided opinions among the Native Americans of the present day as to how their people were created. Not all believe in the conventional wisdom as taught by anthropologists. Some believe in the UFO-related origin stories handed down for centuries and see those beliefs made all the more real by continued contact experiences happening in the modern world.

*** Once you have made the leap of faith and accept that the alien presence for Native Americans is real, how do you communicate with these otherworldly “gods”? Learn some of the chants, songs and ceremonies used since ancient times to placate and entreat the great spirits.

*******

Indian starseed cover

The American Indian UFO-Starseed Connection

It is generally acknowledged that the myths and legends of nearly all Native Americans have a rich and varied history of an interaction with the “Sky People” or “Star People” in common with one another. In a book recently reissued by Timothy Green Beckley’s Inner Light/Global Communications, entitled “The American Indian UFO-Starseed Connection,” this idea is thoroughly explored by a number of well-known authors, to include the late Brad Steiger, whose numerous books on paranormal subjects have sold many millions of copies.

UFO BELIEVERS AND UNBELIEVERS

One of the Native American sources Steiger spoke to directly for his chapter told him, “I doubt very much if you will find another Indian who will tell you this, but I don’t believe there is any doubt whatsoever that there are Indian people on the face of the Earth who did not originate on this planet.”

But there exists a schism among Native Americans about their true origin. Some of the Hopi, for example, believe in a tribal descent from the UFO occupants and an ancient culture while others favor the more orthodox, anthropological description of their lineage. Meanwhile, a collection of predictions labeled the “Hopi Prophecies” are believed to predict not only that exact schism of spiritual faith but the coming of the UFOs as well in what sounds like a Native American version of the coming apocalypse.native american indian and ufo

A petroglyph in Arizona is said to show a dome-shaped flying saucer with an arrow on top that represents travel through space. The Hopi maiden on the dome shape represents “purity,” delivering an ominous warning about the future “Purification Day.”

“Those Hopi who survive Purification Day will be taken to other planets,” the Native American source told Steiger. “We, the faithful Hopi, have seen the ships and know they are true. We have watched nearly all our brethren lose faith in the original teachings and go off on their own course.”

ANCIENT ROCK ART FROM THE STARS TELLS THE TALE

There is still much to learn, however, from the faithful of ancient days. Steiger runs through a catalog of petroglyphs, or stone carvings, and pictographs, or stone paintings. Thirty miles northeast of Price, Utah, is the beginning of one of the most unusual canyons in the nation, Nine Mile Canyon.

“Prior to 1100 A.D., the Fremont culture occupied the canyon,” Steiger writes, “and the records they left in the form of petroglyphs and pictographs comprise the heaviest concentration of rock art in the world today. The Fremont people developed their own art style, which, interestingly, was typified by horned, trapezoidal-bodied, human-like ‘anthropomorphs.’ Were these creatures somehow symbolic of nature spirits? Or did they truly represent visitations by beings decidedly different from the Fremont people’s other Amerindian neighbors?”

fremontrockart

Nine Mile Canyon petroglyph.

Another fascinating petroglyph in Nine Mile Canyon consists of a horned person-like figure. To someone of an ancient astronaut bent, the horns may be the sprouting of antennae from a space helmet.

“In this instance,” Steiger writes, “the creature is standing before a row of upraised human hands, which seems to imply awe, reverence or fear. To the human figure’s left, there is a disc-like object. To the disc’s left, there is an upside down human figure faintly etched in the stone.”

In Christina Lake, British Columbia, Canada, one finds a most intriguing pictograph in a natural grotto. The drawing depicts a white disc with black wing-like protuberances hovering over four figures who appear to have bent their knees in an attitude of reverence. Squiggly lines, perhaps suggestive of rays of light, emanate from the top of the object. Longer, more irregular lines extend from the bottom of the disc, possibly portraying smoke or fire.

It is noteworthy that Native American artists – separated by time and thousands of miles – chose to portray not just the appearing of the UFOs but also the awe and reverence with which they as mere mortals had responded to the ships. This is consistent, of course, with similar encounters in the Bible as well as ancient astronaut lore from throughout the world.

MARRIAGES MADE IN THE STARS

Brad and sherry steiger Indian Wisdom

As described in their book, “Indian Wisdom And Its Guiding Power,” Brad and Sherry share lunch with the Uros Indians on their remote island. The Uros honor a mandate not to accept any of humankind’s technology in order to have the Sacred Ones they believe they have descended from return for them in the End Times.

Steiger also discusses the correlations between Native American myths and fairy lore from the European continent, including the notion of mortals of both sexes having amorous relations with beings from beyond.

“The legends of Native Americans contain many accounts of Star Wives and Star Husbands,” he writes. “Although there may be individual cultural differences from tribe to tribe, the basic accounts of the Star Husband could be outlined in this way: A young girl sleeping outside the lodge or wigwam is taken away during the night by the Star People. She awakens to find herself in a different world and the bride of a Star Husband.

“Although life is pleasant in Star Land,” Steiger continues, “the girl grows lonesome for her own people. From time to time, she is permitted to look into a hole through which she can see her tribesmen. But if she grows too despondent, she is permitted to return to her tribe, usually after performing a task which seems to her nonsensical. If a child has been produced by their union, it is usually required that she leave her offspring with her Star Husband and his people.”

A MODERN DAY NATIVE AMERICAN EXPERIENCER

In another chapter of “The American Indian UFO-STARSEED Connection,” we read the first person account of “Dennis,” a Native American, and his UFO encounters, some of which he experienced while undergoing a rite of passage to male adulthood. Dennis hails from a section of New Mexico located between the towns of Grants and Raymond.

“I come from a country,” Dennis begins, “that is 7,000 to 10,000 feet above sea level, with ponderosa and high pines. It is known for what we call ‘spook lights.’ They are usually red or blue. We have a lava flow that is undatable. Some archeologists have tried to date it, but they can’t figure out when it erupted. We have a couple of active volcano areas. There are a few areas which cannot be explored because of the terrain. The Indians have many legends about these areas.

“When I was growing up,” he continues, “I remember seeing lights zip across the sky. There have been archeologists in the area. Most of them don’t make it past midnight. Something scares them!”

A RITUAL OF TERROR

Dennis goes on to talk about undergoing the traditional initiation ceremony.

“What happens is, you are taken out to an area blindfolded and left there. You are supposed to stay in that area for 24 to 48 hours, depending on how big of a wimp they think you are. A few don’t make it. The first time I went out, I didn’t make it. The canyon, just below me, lit up as bright as day. Being very young, I decided that running through the cactus at high speed and jumping barbed wire fences would be safer than sticking around. So I went screaming back to the village.”

strange cloud over second mesa native american indian

Strange clouds have often appeared over Second Mesa (AZ) and have been connected with the disappearance of members of various Native American tribes.

When Dennis tried the ritual again a few years later, a similar thing happened. Only this time, when he saw the large lights, he decided to move in closer and explore. By the time he reached the area that had been so illuminated, the light had dimmed and gone away.

Like Steiger’s Native American friend, Dennis also complains of unbelievers in his community.

“The tradition tells of different types of visitations,” he writes. “I grew up with people who believed that if there was a visitation, it was our government causing it. If we had a flying saucer in the area, it had a U.S. Air Force sticker on it. Later on, these people became unsettled by things they had seen out there.”

As an example, Dennis offers the story of the sighting of a pair of red dots that appeared over the horizon as the tribe was conducting their traditional races. The dots looked like they were sitting right on the mountain. Within a few seconds they took off across the sky. On their way across, they did a “few tricks.” Then they went across the horizon and disappeared. The startled witnesses began to pray and meditate, seeking to find out what was going on.

WITCH DOCTORS AND BABIES FROM THE SKY

Dennis had also heard reports of witch doctors who started their walk in New Mexico and all of a sudden showed up in Mexico, traveling two or three thousand miles in a couple of days.

“The witch doctor who did this was old when I was growing up,” Dennis writes, “and he’s still around. I met him and I remember him from the time when I was two or three years old. He still walks through the desert, still makes his meditation runs and his medicine runs. He has some charms that are very unusual.”

Later, as an adult in the military service stationed in California, Dennis again brushed up against the paranormal.

mtshasta

Mt. Shasta.

“Even the Indians that I met in California had legends,” he said. “I got into the Yeti/Bigfoot legends when in I was in the service. I found that many tribes which were up on Mount Shasta all had a joint story. It was about a baby born from a sphere that had fallen from the sky. They [these children] were supposed to be stronger than normal and hairier than normal. They were supposed to have all kinds of abnormal characteristics. They could not speak as we do, yet they communicated among themselves.”

An anthropologist from the Denver Museum visited an area near Dennis’ home in an attempt to investigate and document the region’s strange native legends. The anthropologist set up his camping gear and waited. But at 10:30 P.M., “something” unknown came into the camp that drove both Dennis and the anthropologist out into the unsheltered night. At first, Dennis had warned the visiting scientist to stay close to the fire because only light could protect them from whatever was making its presence felt. Two minutes later the anthropologist was packing up and heading for his jeep. The fear was simply too much for him.

Dennis seems to be speaking of creatures resembling the often-seen small “gray” aliens as the culprit in the above story.

“These creatures are not Bigfoot,” Dennis said. “Their height is about 3’11’ or maybe four feet. I’ve never seen them during the day. I know that they walk on two legs. They are also ambidextrous.”

Dennis said he believes the diminutive creatures love dill pickles. He tried baiting a trap with dill pickles for the creatures but they managed to get the pickles without setting off the trip wires.

THE MAGIC THAT COMES WITH GENUINE CONTACT

lost indian magic cover

Lost Indian Magic

Having established the possibility of an ongoing contact being shared by some Native Americans and the UFO occupants, how has this contact been made manifest in the day-to-day lives of the indigenous earthlings? To answer this question, we turn to another book from Timothy Green Beckley’s Global Communications publishing house called “Lost Indian Magic.”

One learns in Lost Indian Magic” that the Native American method of contacting the spirits that are believed to rule over their lives is to chant or sing to them. “Lost Indian Magic” includes a song intended to serve as a love charm. The words seem to mean that the man singing the song wants to isolate his beloved from the rest of the world.

“Place her standing up on the earth. Where her feet are now and wherever she may go, let loneliness leave its mark upon her. Let her be marked out for loneliness where she stands. I belong to the Wolf Clan. No one is ever lonely with me. I am handsome. Let her put her soul in the very center of my soul, never to turn away.”

Obviously, it is easier to work a love charm on a lonely woman than one surrounded by competing suitors.

That song is followed by one intended to insure the woman’s constancy.

“This woman’s soul has come to rest at the edge of your body. You are never to let go your hold upon it. Let her never think upon any other place. The woman has put her soul into our hands. We shall never let it go!”

There are similar songs included inLost Indian Magic” intended to ensure the faithfulness of one’s spouse. But, interestingly, a song to be sung by a jealous rival is also in the mix. The song is “For Separation of Lovers.” Tobacco is used in this particular ceremony.

“The blue tobacco has come to be your recompense. You have alighted midway between them where they two are standing. You have spoiled their souls immediately. They have at once become separated. Let her eyes in their sockets be forever watching for me. There is no loneliness where my body is.”

The fact that such a song exists for the sake of a jealous rival implies a surprising frankness about human nature. Whatever spirits devised the words seem to be unfazed by a love interest from outside a given marriage. Could it be used as evidence in divorce court?

BIRTH TOTEMS: WHAT’S YOUR SIGN?

nativeamericans

The reader may enjoy another aspect of Native American lore called “The Birth Totem.” It springs from the Native American tradition that everything in life is a circle. This understanding of the cosmos resulted from their observation that the sun moves in a circle, from morning to night and then back again to another morning. The waxing and waning of the moon, from full moon to dark moon and back again, is also a circular movement. They also concluded from the changing of the seasons that the Earth itself moved in a circle as well.

They divided the circular year into 12 “moons,” with each moon possessing its own set of animal, mineral and plant totems. Each of these totems possessed certain qualities that could be passed onto people depending upon the moon under which they were born. The 12 birth totems are similar to the 12 signs of the zodiac we are already familiar with.

As with the zodiac, the characteristics listed for each totem are not necessarily the traits that everyone born under that totem possesses. Each person is unique and moves along in their own way and at their own speed. But those born under the same moon tend to share certain broadly defined qualities.

The fun part is finding your own birth totem moon using the handy chart provided. For example, my birthday falls within what is called the “Rest and Cleansing Moon.” My animal totem is the Otter, and my mineral totem is Turquoise. I’m said to be broadminded, lively, unconventional, perceptive, inventive, self-assured, self-reliant, dynamic, friendly and artistic. I sound like a great guy using this totem system, eh?

THE STORY THAT THE MOONS TELL

nativeamericansfire

In the far reaches of the ever-mysterious desert, the Indian campfires of the long ago heard many a tale worth the telling.

Lost Indian Magic” also provides a listing of sacred herbs to be used in the various ceremonies before it launches into a reprinting of a book from 1918, written by Grace Purdie Moon and Carl Moon, consisting of what the Moons call “A Mystery of the Red Man As He Lived Before the White Men Came.” This long lost and rare book featured paintings and photos by Carl Moon, which Beckley has faithfully reproduced in this newer version.

Surprisingly, for its time, the book is remarkably free of any anthropological bias or prejudice. The authors recount a mystery story that engages the reader from its opening lines and never lets go.

“Out in the region of the sage and the pine,” the Moons write in their Foreword, “in the far reaches of the ever-mysterious desert, the Indian campfires of the long ago heard many a tale worth the telling. Some there were that have been handed down, through the channel of an unwrit tongue, from age to youth – told, retold, and told again until they come to the hearing of even you and me. Thus the ancient tale of the Lost Magic comes to be set down.

“It may be that the legend loses somewhat,” they continue, “in parting with the strange tongue that gave it birth, but the thread on which the crude beads of its adventures are strung runs back even to the first account, and may be of the same spinning.”

The story tells of the protective magic given to the Ah-co tribe by a small bear carved out of turquoise. The artifact is stolen by another tribe who are jealous of the good fortune the bear heaps upon its people. With the bear’s loss comes the inevitable want, woe and disaster for the Ah-co. Seasons pass, but finally the Great Spirit, whose symbol is the sun, goes forth to find the little blue bear and restore it to his people.

Sounds like the kind of story one could envision as a summer blockbuster movie. It’s even a little reminiscent of a “Star Wars” episode with, say, Luke Skywalker going out to do battle for some aspect of the Force while fighting to restore a semblance of moral order to a galaxy far, far away.

In any case, if you’re interested in the ancient astronauts legends of the Native Americans and the spiritual practices intended to obtain the blessings of this powerful alien force, then “The American Indian UFO-Starseed Connection” and “Lost Indian Magic” should be at the top of your reading list. When it comes to contacting the gods of old in today’s world, Timothy Green Beckley’s books often contain just what the spiritual seeker needs in order to reach out and speak to the waiting, ever-patient unknown.

Sean Casteel headshot April 2015

Sean Casteel

SUGGESTED READING

THE AMERICAN INDIAN UFO STARSEED CONNECTION

LOST INDIAN MAGIC

LEGACY OF THE SKY PEOPLE: THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL ORIGIN OF ADAM AND EVE; THE GARDEN OF EDEN; NOAH’S ARK AND THE SERPENT RACE

OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL: “Mr. UFO’s Secret Files”